For AICP planners, the Certificate Maintenance (CM) credits for all sessions are available to log at https://www.planning.org/events/eventmulti/9225481/ and listed individually with each session, below.


Live Session Recordings

MONDAY | November 15

Welcome and Keynote Address - Ilana Preuss | CM 1

Ilana Preuss is the Founder of Recast City LLC, a consulting firm that works with city leaders, real estate developers, and other civic leaders to integrate space for small-scale producers into redevelopment projects and place-based economic development. She is passionate about making great places and sees that small-scale manufacturers are a missing piece in today's mixed-use development and commercial property repositioning. With over 20 years of experience in city development, Preuss works with real estate developers, economic development corporations, and other local leaders to go from idea to plan to action to build great places with vibrant economies. She supports businesses and organizations to develop strategies with measurable and achievable outcomes.

Preuss' passion for great places grew out of her experience working with big and small cities all over the country when she led the technical assistance program at the U.S. EPA Smart Growth Program, and as the Vice President and Chief of Staff at Smart Growth America. Now through her work at Recast City, Preuss works with business leaders to understand the local small-scale manufacturing sector, discover the potential to enhance real estate development, and tap state and federal resources for support. She works with real estate developers to integrate small-scale manufacturing businesses into new and rehab products to increase a project's value and draw people to the target neighborhood. She works with economic development authorities to identify key assets in the local community and build goals and tactics to create vibrant and sustainable economic growth. Preuss' book, Recast Your City, was released by Island Press in 2021.

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After Single-Family Zoning Ends, the Economics Remain: Lessons from Montgomery County’s Attainable Housing Strategies | CM 1

The session directly relates to practical efforts to address a key issue in planning involving our approach to land use and social justice. Efforts to reform single-family zoning is a main effort currently underway in the planning profession to increase diversity and enable more equitable access to high-opportunity neighborhoods. In focusing on the potential impacts the session helps to set expectations for what the profession can do, while empowering attendees with arguments for why it is important to advance reforms regardless of the impact to housing supply. 

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Advancing Housing Equity in the Washington Metropolitan Region Webinar | CM 1

This session helps advance diversity and equity through its focus on housing equity and racial equity and addressing historic racist land use and housing policies in the Washington Metropolitan Region. Panelists will share examples of how these housing production targets sparked important government and community conversations on racial equity and laid the basis for equity-centered planning and implementation efforts. 

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TUESDAY | November 16

Expanding Washington's Local and National Commemorative Landscape | CM 1

Commemorative Works representing African Americans, Native Americans, Women, Asian Americans, LGBTQ+ people, and Hispanic and Latino Americans, including the many communities, identities, races, ethnicities, backgrounds, abilities, cultures, and beliefs of these American people, are vastly under commemorated in  Washington, DC’s memorial landscape. The session will share how the National Capital Planning Commission and the District of Columbia Government are addressing the need for a more inclusive commemorative landscape.

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Extending the 15th Street Cycletrack Through the National Mall: Key Factors of Success| CM 1

The project team partners prioritized equitable and safe access to the National Mall over vehicle roadway capacity and balanced other project challenges which included the displacement of vendors due to the new roadway reallocation, White House operations, and preservation of historic viewsheds. 

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Past, Present, Future: A look at St. Elizabeth’s East and West Campuses | CM 1

St. Elizabeth’s is located in Ward 8, a predominantly African American community with significant levels of poverty and lack of access to jobs, services, health care, and other opportunities. The panel will discuss approaches and lessons learned for public engagement and creating local opportunities for short- and long-term employment, business development, and education to build career ladders.

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WEDNESDAY | November 17

The Night Bus: Leveraging Big Data and Targeted Engagement for Equitable Late-Night Transit Planning | CM 1

The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (Metro) Late-Night Mobility Study was guided by the fact that late-night/early-morning transit provides a vital link to economic mobility, and late-shift workers have a critical need for public transit service for many reasons. Additionally, many late-night and early-morning travelers are essential workers, and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has further highlighted the need to provide safe and reliable transit choices for these populations. As a part of the study, Metro was able to leverage its internal resources to poll existing users of the system to identify relevant participants for the targeted focus groups. This session will include a focus on the study’s engagement efforts to the late-night and early morning transit-riding population (much of which includes members of historically underrepresented populations and neighborhoods), which aimed to gain information on lived experiences, needs, and desires to bolster and compliment the study’s technical analysis.


Nick Addamo 
Lucas Muller 
Melissa Kim

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The Path to Community Engagement: The Road Best Traveled | CM 1

The District of Columbia in all aspects of government and management strives to be an inclusive City. The Office of Planning plays a key role in fostering diversity and ensuring equity in every aspect of planning. In our presentation we share why it is necessary to stretch the limits of traditional outreach and engagement. How do you reach the youth population? How do your reach those for whom English is their second language? How do we engage citizens who may be visually or hearing impaired? How do we overcome barriers and perceptions that planning is a done deal and the community has no real voice? How do we as planners maintain our perspective, remain objective while moving forward with engaging stakeholders in the process? The session will be a combination of panel presentation as well as open discussion among the panel members and attendees.

Deborah Crain-Kemp
Faith Broderick
Ashley Stephens

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Land Use Law Update | CM 1.5 (LAW)

This session reviews recent developments in land use law that impacts land use planners in the National Capital Region. Recent caselaw, within the past 10 years or less, forms the focus of the session, but recent legislation will also be reviewed. United States Supreme Court cases and other federal court cases in recent years have dramatically changed the planner's approach to sign ordinances. In addition, several regulatory takings cases impact how planning regulations should be approached. Federal courts have also weighed in on issues related to the Federal Telecommunications Act (including small cells), the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA), and other First Amendment issues.

In state courts and state legislatures, tiny homes, open government laws, short term rentals and dilapidated and abandoned properties have been issues of note. COVID-19 impacts many of these issues, and the legal issues arising from COVID-19 will be discussed.

Jesse Richardson

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Pre-Recorded Sessions

Innovative Capital Planning for Civic Infrastructure and Facilities | CM 1

Equity is a vital precept in the District’s planning of high-quality, accessible, efficiently managed, and properly funded civic facilities, including through planning for the equitable delivery of services that support the needs of the populations they serve. This presentation will discuss efforts to incorporate racial equity guidance from the District’s recent Comprehensive Plan update into the CIP formulation process.  

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Montgomery County's Pedestrian Survey - Understanding Pedestrian Behavior & Preferences | CM 0.25

The pedestrian survey was intentional in its design in order to ensure that findings are representative of Montgomery County residents. The results are weighted based on income, race, and ethnicity.

In addition, questions were asked about participants’ physical and mental impairments, and results were then disaggregated to understand how travel behavior and perceptions of the pedestrian environment differ based on a respondent’s reported disability.

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Assessing Distribution of bus transit service for equity during Covid-19 pandemic | CM 0.25

The study’s definition of “marginalized populations” included: people of color, persons with disabilities, low-income households, low-wage workers (both home and work locations), veterans, languages other than English (LOTE) populations, and zero and one car households.

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Bicycle Level of Traffic Stress (LTS) as a Planning Tool | CM 0.5

As a component of DDOT's moveDC long-range transportation plan, a Bicycle Level of Traffic Stress (LTS) analysis was incorporated to evaluate the impacts of traffic, street configurations, and other related factors on a bicyclist's comfort level. For this analysis, each roadway in the District was given a score from one to four based on how stressful the roadway's conditions are for bicyclists. Associating a stress level score to each roadway allowed for clear comparisons of the network across the District, as well as a quantitative metric to track network improvements over time. The LTS results were also used to measure connectivity of the bicycle network by determining how far a bicyclist could travel using only low-stress roadways. These findings were then used to identify how many jobs were accessible from each census block in the District by bicycle.

In this session, attendees will learn how an LTS analysis can be implemented and tailored to fit the specific goals and needs of a jurisdiction, as well as how LTS results can be used as a planning tool for scenario planning, project prioritization, and ongoing analysis such as performance monitoring.

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Pivoting Planners: Virtual Engagement in a Pandemic | CM 0.5

In the height of a global pandemic how do planners conduct critical community engagement and encourage public participation in planning when forced to operate from the confines of our own personal spaces? The Prince George’s County Planning Department was tasked with working through this exact constraint, in addition to engaging communities of marginalized groups jaded and fearful of the planning process. In this session, planners for the West Hyattsville-Queens Chapel Sector plan from the Prince George’s Planning Department and AECOM will share: 1) the innovative engagement strategies and virtual platforms, including an interactive 3D virtual town hall space, that the team used to connect with communities; 2) the challenges of virtual engagement, specifically with hard-to-reach groups in a planning area with a large Spanish speaking populous; 3) lessons learned for virtually engaging bilingual audiences, and lastly 4) the best practices uncovered by the project team through this virtual engagement process.

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View session recording (Part 2) - this recording is provided in two parts due to a recording error


Supporting Clusters of Diverse/Small/Independent Retailers Coming out of COVID | CM 0.25

This session directly relates to the themes of diversity and equity within communities through its focus on helping planners learn about the tools and initiatives to support traditionally under-resourced and under-served minority retailers. Additionally, this session relates to equity within the institution of planning in its focus on preserving small/minority retailers that are at greater risk of displacement from development

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Largo Wayfinding, Branding and Placemaking Strategy | CM 0.25

The recommendations in the report are being crafted with significant input from the existing community. There is a sensitivity associated with large scale development in an area leading to a risk of gentrification. The Planning Department is engaging with existing communities and partner agencies to ensure those voices are heard, and the recommendations reflect the existing population, culture and values.

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A Hotter Solution to Freeway Congestion in the Washington Metro Area| CM 0.25

A proposal to address freeway congestion by creating a network of High-Occupancy Toll (HOT) lanes in the Maryland portion of the Washington metro area has been controversial. Expanding highways, such as by adding new HOT lanes, will simply encourage further auto-centric development. Suburbanization of low-income households and jobs will make non-auto commutes more difficult. And the reduced delays will induce new auto trips by those who were previously deterred by congestion, an unintended consequence that cancels out apparent advantages. This presentation will provide a better solution, HOTTER lanes – lanes with High-Occupancy vehicles, Transit, and Tolls on Existing Rights-of-way – that could be created by converting existing lanes to congestion-priced toll lanes. Toll revenues could then be used to provide cash incentives for transit and carpool use and dramatically expand equitable mobility options, returning toll revenue to carpool and transit commuters’ pockets, restraining urban sprawl, and providing new, affordable travel choices for those who don’t drive, and the choice of a fast, reliable trip for those who do. And a financially viable network of HOTTER lanes will be available to facilitate safe deployment of automated vehicles throughout the freeway system.

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The Transit Critical Matrix: Using data to evaluate route "essentialness" | CM 0.25

The Maryland Transit Administration’s (MDOT MTA) Transit Critical Matrix is a new tool developed to visualize the relative importance of each transit mode and route to the agency’s mission of providing equitable service.

The Transit Critical Matrix helps MDOT MTA evaluate service changes and prioritize funding across routes and modes by comparing two key attributes of a route: an Equity Value, derived from data about who rides each route collected from passenger surveys, along with demographic and employment data about a route’s service area; and a Ridership Value representing route productivity in terms of the ridership a route produces per vehicle revenue hour.

MDOT MTA uses a systemwide Transit Critical Matrix to help inform decisions on how to distribute funding between modes based on each mode’s particular role in the overall system. MDOT MTA also uses a route-level Transit Critical Matrix within each mode to help weigh service change decisions and understand which routes are most essential for maintaining access for riders with a high need for transit. The Transit Critical Matrix is also adaptable to other uses by replacing Ridership Value in the matrix with alternative KPIs measuring productivity or performance.

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